Design Library – Part 2

At Google I/O 2015 the Material Design Support Library was announced, and with it creating material apps targeting API levels below API 19 suddenly got a lot easier. In this series we’ll look at taking the RSS Reader app that we used as a basis for the Material series, and re-write it to make full use of the new Design Support Library. Previously we looked at getting a basic navigation drawer working and in this post we’ll look at how to implement a tab bar.
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Design Library – Part 1

At Google I/O 2015 the Material Design Support Library was announced, and with it creating material apps targeting API levels below API 19 suddenly got a lot easier. In this series we’ll look at taking the RSS Reader app that we used as a basis for the Material series, and re-write it to make full use of the new Design Support Library.
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Manual Layout Transitions – Part 4

Layout transitions are an important aspect of Material design as they help to indicate the user flow through an app, and help to tie visual components together as the user navigates. Two important tools for achieving this are Activity Transitions (which we’ll cover in the future) and Layout Transitions which we have covered on Styling Android before. However Layout Transitions are only supported in API 19 and later. Previously we created two distinct layout states and were able to toggle between them transitioning nicely, but there was a hard requirement of our implementation that any Views in our starting layout must have corresponding Views in the destination layout and vice versa. In this article we’ll look at removing that restriction.
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Manual Layout Transitions – Part 3

Layout transitions are an important aspect of Material design as they help to indicate the user flow through an app, and help to tie visual components together as the user navigates. Two important tools for achieving this are Activity Transitions (which we’ll cover in the future) and Layout Transitions which we have covered on Styling Android before. However Layout Transitions are only supported in API 19 and later. Previously we created two distinct layout states and were able to toggle between them, in this article we’ll get them animating.
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Manual Layout Transitions – Part 2

Layout transitions are an important aspect of Material design as they help to indicate the user flow through an app, and help to tie visual components together as the user navigates. Two important tools for achieving this are Activity Transitions (which we’ll cover in the future) and Layout Transitions which we have covered on Styling Android before. However Layout Transitions are only supported in API 19 and later. Previously we looked at how the animations in Dirty Phrasebook were achieved, and in this article we’ll take a further step and look to automatically generate animations between two distinct layout states.
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Manual Layout Transitions – Part 1

Layout transitions are an important aspect of Material design as they help to indicate the user flow through an app, and help to tie visual components together as the user navigates. Two important tools for achieving this are Activity Transitions (which we’ll cover in the future) and Layout Transitions which we have covered on Styling Android before. However Layout Transitions are only supported in API 19 and later. In this series of articles we’ll look at how we can implement some nice transition animations even when we don’t have access to the transitions APIs.
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Dirty Phrasebook – Part 6

On 1st April 2015 I published a joke app to Google Play named Dirty Phrasebook which is based upon Monty Python’s Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook sketch. I this series of articles we’ll take a look in to the code (which will be open-sourced along with the final article). In this article we’ll look at the how Text-To_Speech was implemented in the app.
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Dirty Phrasebook – Part 5

On 1st April 2015 I published a joke app to Google Play named Dirty Phrasebook which is based upon Monty Python’s Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook sketch. I this series of articles we’ll take a look in to the code (which will be open-sourced along with the final article). In this article we’ll continue looking at the UI logic.
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Dirty Phrasebook – Part 4

On 1st April 2015 I published a joke app to Google Play named Dirty Phrasebook which is based upon Monty Python’s Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook sketch. In this series of articles we’ll take a look in to the code (which will be open-sourced along with the final article). In this article we’ll look at the custom View that we use to handle user input.
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Dirty Phrasebook – Part 3

On 1st April 2015 I published a joke app to Google Play named Dirty Phrasebook which is based upon Monty Python’s Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook sketch. I this series of articles we’ll take a look in to the code (which will be open-sourced along with the final article). In this article we’ll turn our attention to the UI.
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