Manual Layout Transitions – Part 2

Layout transitions are an important aspect of Material design as they help to indicate the user flow through an app, and help to tie visual components together as the user navigates. Two important tools for achieving this are Activity Transitions (which we’ll cover in the future) and Layout Transitions which we have covered on Styling Android before. However Layout Transitions are only supported in API 19 and later. Previously we looked at how the animations in Dirty Phrasebook were achieved, and in this article we’ll take a further step and look to automatically generate animations between two distinct layout states.
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Manual Layout Transitions – Part 1

Layout transitions are an important aspect of Material design as they help to indicate the user flow through an app, and help to tie visual components together as the user navigates. Two important tools for achieving this are Activity Transitions (which we’ll cover in the future) and Layout Transitions which we have covered on Styling Android before. However Layout Transitions are only supported in API 19 and later. In this series of articles we’ll look at how we can implement some nice transition animations even when we don’t have access to the transitions APIs.
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Dirty Phrasebook – Part 6

On 1st April 2015 I published a joke app to Google Play named Dirty Phrasebook which is based upon Monty Python’s Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook sketch. I this series of articles we’ll take a look in to the code (which will be open-sourced along with the final article). In this article we’ll look at the how Text-To_Speech was implemented in the app.
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Dirty Phrasebook – Part 5

On 1st April 2015 I published a joke app to Google Play named Dirty Phrasebook which is based upon Monty Python’s Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook sketch. I this series of articles we’ll take a look in to the code (which will be open-sourced along with the final article). In this article we’ll continue looking at the UI logic.
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Dirty Phrasebook – Part 4

On 1st April 2015 I published a joke app to Google Play named Dirty Phrasebook which is based upon Monty Python’s Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook sketch. In this series of articles we’ll take a look in to the code (which will be open-sourced along with the final article). In this article we’ll look at the custom View that we use to handle user input.
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Dirty Phrasebook – Part 3

On 1st April 2015 I published a joke app to Google Play named Dirty Phrasebook which is based upon Monty Python’s Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook sketch. I this series of articles we’ll take a look in to the code (which will be open-sourced along with the final article). In this article we’ll turn our attention to the UI.
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Dirty Phrasebook – Part 2

On 1st April 2015 I published a joke app to Google Play named Dirty Phrasebook which is based upon Monty Python’s Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook sketch. I this series of articles we’ll take a look in to the code (which will be open-sourced along with the final article). In this article we’ll look at the remainder of translation mechanism used to (hopefully) reliably and repeatable translate the user’s input in to one of the phrases from the sketch.
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Dirty Phrasebook – Part 1

On 1st April 2015 I published a joke app to Google Play named Dirty Phrasebook which is based upon Monty Python’s Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook sketch. I this series of articles we’ll take a look in to the code (which will be open-sourced along with the final article). In the first article we’ll begin to look at the translation mechanism used to (hopefully) reliably and repeatable translate the user’s input in to one of the phrases from the sketch.
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Custom Colour Spans

Regular readers of Styling Android should know that I’m a huge fan of Spans and believe that a good understanding of Spans is essential in order to get the best out of TextView. That said sometimes just doing simple things, such as simply changing the text colour, can seem a little awkward. In this article we’ll look at how to roll your own Span implementations, and see how easy it can be to utilise custom Spans.
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