ConstraintLayout – Part 3

At Google IO 2016 Google announced a new Android layout named ConstraintLayout. Despite the initial release being labelled as an Alpha release, it is actually pretty stable (with a few caveats). In this series of articles we’ll take a look at this new layout-kid on the block and try and get some insights in how best to use it.
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ConstraintLayout – Part 2

At Google IO 2016 Google announced a new Android layout named ConstraintLayout. Despite the initial release being labelled as an Alpha release, it is actually pretty stable (with a few caveats). In this series of articles we’ll take a look at this new layout-kid on the block and try and get some insights in how best to use it.
Continue reading

ConstraintLayout – Part 1

At Google IO 2016 Google announced a new Android layout named ConstraintLayout. Despite the initial release being labelled as an Alpha release, it is actually pretty stable (with a few caveats). In this series of articles we’ll take a look at this new layout-kid on the block and try and get some insights in how best to use it.
Continue reading

FlexboxLayout – Part 3

In May 2016 a new project was pushed to the official Google Github repo named flexbox-layout. It is an Android layout manager which offers similar behaviour to the CSS flexible box layout module. In this series we’ll take a look at FlexboxLayout and try and gain some insights in to how it works and how to get the best out of it. In this article we’ll look at some real world examples that can be achieved using FlexboxLayout.
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FlexboxLayout – Part2

In May 2016 a new project was pushed to the official Google Github repo named flexbox-layout. It is an Android layout manager which offers similar behaviour to the CSS flexible box layout module. In this series we’ll take a look at FlexboxLayout and try and gain some insights in to how it works and how to get the best out of it. In this article we’ll look at the layout attributes which can be applied to child Views to control how they are positioned within the parent FlexboxLayout.
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Something O’Clock – Part 6

On 1st April 2016 I published Something O’Clock, a watch face app for Android Wear, to Play Store. The app is lighthearted in nature (because of the date of publication), it allows the user to set the time to “beer o’clock”, or “sleep o’clock”, or even “burger o’clock”. Although the app itself is quite lighthearted the code behind it is worthy of study and, in this series we’ll take a look at various aspects of developing custom watch faces for Android Wear. In this concluding article we’ll look at how we update the watch-face UI in response to configuration changes.
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Something O’Clock – Part 5

On 1st April 2016 I published Something O’Clock, a watch face app for Android Wear, to Play Store. The app is lighthearted in nature (because of the date of publication), it allows the user to set the time to “beer o’clock”, or “sleep o’clock”, or even “burger o’clock”. Although the app itself is quite lighthearted the code behind it is worthy of study and, in this series we’ll take a look at various aspects of developing custom watch faces for Android Wear. In this article we’ll consider storing the current configuration within the wear app.
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Something O’Clock – Part 4

On 1st April 2016 I published Something O’Clock, a watch face app for Android Wear, to Play Store. The app is lighthearted in nature (because of the date of publication), it allows the user to set the time to “beer o’clock”, or “sleep o’clock”, or even “burger o’clock”. Although the app itself is quite lighthearted the code behind it is worthy of study and, in this series we’ll take a look at various aspects of developing custom watch faces for Android Wear. In this article we’ll look at handling configuration changes from the companion mobile app on the Wear device itself.
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Something O’Clock – Part 3

On 1st April 2016 I published Something O’Clock, a watch face app for Android Wear, to Play Store. The app is lighthearted in nature (because of the date of publication), it allows the user to set the time to “beer o’clock”, or “sleep o’clock”, or even “burger o’clock”. Although the app itself is quite lighthearted the code behind it is worthy of study and, in this series we’ll take a look at various aspects of developing custom watch faces for Android Wear. In this article we’ll look creating a companion app to run on the phone connected to the Wear device.
Continue reading